Posts

Enthoo Evolv by Nenad “neSSa” Djordjevic

Liquid cooling does not have to be flashy and full with RGB. It does not need to have a heavily modded case. In fact, you don’t even need to have custom sleeved cables. Sometimes, liquid cooling is used for regular power-packed PCs, simply because it offers the best performance. Also, you get to have a very cool looking silent PC. This build is brought to us by Nenad “neSSa” Đorđević, the host of SS PC Modding.

Project Aorus by Hans Peder Sahl

Project Aorus was initially thought to be a simple show build with some water cooling and custom cables, but as Hans Peder “p0pe” Sahl explains, it often happens that he gets carried away and decides to make his own custom water cooling parts for the build. This project was first exposed live in Leipzig at Dreamhack 2017, Gigabyte – Aorus event.

Radiators Part 3 – Small and thick or slim and big?

Time to continue the story about radiators for liquid cooling. We have covered the basics about radiators in the Part 1 blog, and in Part 2 we even showed some charts. Part 2 clarified things about radiator performance, how radiator performance is expressed and how do we read radiator performance charts. We have shown how two of the most popular radiator sizes (120 and 140mm), with different thickness variants, relate to one another performance-wise.

D-Frame 2.0 by Malik Customs

It is hard to go unnoticed when you build a PC in one of In Win`s D-Frame 2.0 open frame cases. Malik Custom pulled off a clean and minimalistic look while he managed to exploit the stock gold paint job of the D-Frame, which is not an easy task. For this magnificent build, Malik Customs was inspired by motorization and industrial design, while the specific character of the In Win D-Frame 2.0 has just added a pinch of elegance to it.

Radiators Part 2 – Performance

The fundamental rule of radiator performance testing is to see how well the radiator cools the coolant. For us, computer geeks, the most widespread way of describing radiator performance is by using W/10°C, or in other words, Watts per 10 Delta T (sometimes K is used instead of ΔT). To make it easier to understand, we are going to look at some performance charts.